Our Stolen Futurea book by Theo Colborn, Dianne Dumanoski, and John Peterson Myers
 
 

 

Some entry points into the field of contamination and obesity:

Heindel, JJ. 2003. Endocrine Disruptors and the Obesity Epidemic. Toxicological Sciences 76: 247-9.

Chemical exposures. Origins of Obesity. 2004. Environmental Health Perspectives 112(6).

Obesity: Developmental Origins and Environmental Influences. A web-cast of a day-long symposium at Duke University sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Some key presentations:

Baillie-Hamilton, PF 2002. Chemical toxins: A hypothesis to explain the global obesity epidemic. J. Alt. and Comp Med. 8, 185–192

Masuno, H, T Kidani, K Sekiya, K Sakayama, T Shiosaka, H Yamamoto and K Honda. 2002. Bisphenol A in combination with insulin can accelerate the conversion of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes.  Journal of Lipid Research 3:676-684.

Newbold, RR, E Padilla-Banks, RJ Snyder and WN Jefferson. 2005. Developmental Exposure to Estrogenic Compounds and Obesity. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 73:478–480.

 

 

 

 

 

 
   
   

 

 

 

OSF Home
 About this website
Newest
Book Basics
  Synopsis & excerpts
  The bottom line
  Key points
  The big challenge
  Chemicals implicated
  The controversy
  Recommendations
New Science
  Broad trends
  Basic mechanisms
  Brain & behavior
  Disease resistance
  Human impacts
  Low dose effects
  Mixtures and synergy
  Ubiquity of exposure
  Natural vs. synthetic
  New exposures
  Reproduction
  Wildlife impacts
Recent Important    Results
Consensus
News/Opinion
Myths vs. Reality
Useful Links
Important Events
Important Books
Other Sources
Other Languages
About the Authors
 
Talk to us: email